Call Us for Inquiry :
+977 98510 23742 (Jitendra)

Tourism Licence No. 1006/065

You are here: Home » Nepal » Trekking » Manaslu Trek » Kathmandu Manaslu Circuit Trek 18 Days

Manaslu Circuit Trek-18 days Kathmandu Manaslu Trek

Manaslu Circuit Trek is an incredible tea house trek from Kathmandu to Manaslu round. The trek is famous for its dramatic landscapes, ecological disparities, ethnicity and alluring Himalayan scenery. Kathmandu Manaslu small trek is suitable for the  hikers who are able to walk 5 to 6 hour in a day with light rucksack. The 18-day trek to Manaslu is full of natural and cultural wonders with local insights. Nepal Trekking Manaslu begins from Kathmandu with an overland bus drive to Soti Khola, and continue trek to Larkya Pass at 5200 m via green hills to high alpine valley. Hence, Manaslu is a perfect and stunning trek adventures into the heart of the Himalayas. Please email us at missionecotreknepal@gmail.com and call or leave message on WhatsApp +977 9851023742 for Manaslu Trek-18 days itinerary, cost and departure dates for 2024/2025.

Trek Facts

Trek Name: Kathmandu Manaslu Trek

Trek Duration:18 Days

Trek Difficulty: Medium / Hard

Trek Season: Sep/Oct/Nov/Dec/Mar/April/May

Trek Altitude: 1300m- 5135m

Trek Cost: USD 1550-USD 1950

Group Size: 1 - 12 people

Trek Package: Private/Group Trek

Mode of Transfer: Bus/Jeep/Car

Start/End of Trek: Kathmandu /Besishahar

18 days trekking around Manaslu region Nepal is the best-less crowded newly explored off the beaten path track in the Himalayas.

  • Kathmandu Manaslu Trek
  • 18 days Itinerary
  • Cost in Details
  • Essential Trek Info
  • Fixed Departure
  • FAQs

Manaslu Trek-18 days Kathmandu Manaslu Circuit Trek is a good balance of walking hours, acclimatization, time to enjoy the views and side trips.This is a optimum length of trek around Manaslu from Kathmandu. Of course if you are on tea-house trekking, you have a great flexibility with your itinerary.Kathmandu Manaslu Trek is an ultimate off the beaten path trek, famous for untouched natural and cultural beauty along with an amazing view of Mt Manaslu, world's 8th highest mountain.

Kathmandu Manaslu Trek is a good trek for those who want to get something different taste of trekking in Nepal. Manaslu region was closed to outsiders until the early 90's and tourism is still restricted. It is also not quite as high as the Annapurna circuit and really is a stunning and less trodden path.The landscapes is beautiful, the Himalayas view is stunning and Manaslu circuit trail is less crowded. The Kathmandu Manaslu Trek is a perfect treks in Nepal for an adventure and scenic trekking in the Himalayas. Manaslu trek belongs to restricted trekking area of Nepal, a minimum two travelers are required for trekking around Manaslu. No doubt, 18 days Manaslu Trekking from Kathmandu is best, walk on beautiful trails enjoying local natives culture and an amazing view of Mt Manaslu. 

Manaslu Trek Difficulty
The paths are mostly in good condition. No technical skills are required so the act of walking is pretty straightforward. The physical effort required, it clearly helps to be as fit as possible. Saying that, you don’t have to be an athlete, far from it. People of all ages and levels of fitness complete the Manaslu Circuit Trek. The key point to remember is to hike at your own pace.Over the course of the trek, you ascend in altitude from 700 m to 5106 m. Much of the route, particularly in the early days, involves plenty of up and down – descending to cross the river, ascending again, then repeating the process further along the trail.

Manaslu Trek Permit
You need three permits-ACAP, MCAP and Manaslu restricted area permit trekking to Manaslu Circuit. We will take care of your trek permit on your behalf once you book Manaslu Trek with us-The Mission Eco Trek & Expedition Pvt. Ltd.The Manaslu Circuit Trek isn’t possible to hike independently. You must hike with guide and there must be at least two people in your group as well as the guide.

Manaslu Trek Accommodation
Accommodation is in guesthouses often called tea houses along the way.Rooms generally are more basic than on the Annapurna Circuit trek.Rooms have two single beds and usually a small window. Pillows and blankets are always provided but a sleeping bag is a must (don’t expect the blankets to be particularly fresh or clean). Think of the blanket as supplementary to your sleeping bag when it gets cold. You also have access to hot shower for an extra cost.

Toilets-There are most often shared toilet facilities rather than en-suite bathrooms on the Manaslu Circuit Trek. These can be inside the main building or in an outhouse. It can be a western style toilet or a squat. Things tend to become more basic in places at higher altitude. You’ll need to have your own toilet paper, and soap isn’t always provided so make sure you have hand sanitizer too. Generally speaking, used toilet paper goes in a bin (read battered old metal can or such like) next to the toilet. You flush the squat toilet by scooping water out of the nearby bucket with whatever receptacle is provided.

Dining Room-There’s always a dining room where meals are served, and it’s a good place to get to know your fellow trekkers. The higher you go, there will usually be a fire in the dining room around dinner time, although this is by no means guaranteed.

Hot Shower-Showers are available over the first few days, but chances for a hot shower dwindle the higher you go. Gas needs to be transported by mules and it’s more important for cooking and heating. It’s sometimes possible to get one for a fee, but you might be standing in a cold room under a spray with very little pressure. Best to be prepared to keep yourself clean with wet wipes and look forward to a hot shower when you reach Dharapani.

Food on Manaslu Trek
Food and drink on the Manaslu Circuit is similar to what you find on Nepal’s other treks, although options are usually more limited than on busier routes like the Annapurna Circuit. Those options become even more limited throughout the trek as altitude increases, while prices go up as the cost of fuel and transporting goods gets higher.

You have to eat dinner and breakfast at your guesthouse you stay. Lunch will generally be at a different place somewhere along the trail unless it’s a short day and you arrive at your destination earlier.Try to order the same as the people you’re trekking with. Your food will usually arrive more quickly and less fuel will be needed to cook it.Think carefully before ordering meat. Refrigeration, storage and kitchen standards mean that eating veggie is the safest option.

Dal Bhat-Dal Bhat is a combination of dal (lentils), veg curry, pickle, rice and vegetables, this staple of the Nepali diet is a great option. It comes with a guaranteed refill of rice and curry, and usually some extra dal too. The vegetable component varies depending on what or if there’s anything growing in the garden (and it pretty much disappears the last few days before the Larke Pass). Dal Bhat is what all guides and porters eat so it’s constantly being prepared, unlike more western style dishes which always have to be made to order. And as the whole cooking process requires less energy, this means that it’s better for the environment too.

Breakfast-Breakfast include porridge, pancakes, omelettes, boiled eggs, and various breads (Tibetan bread, buckwheat bread, chapatis, and so on).

Main Dishes(Lunch and Dinner)-Standard dishes on menus are soups, pasta dishes, various fried rice dishes, momos, a kind of dumpling, pizzas, and of course, Dal Bhat. Some dishes have meat options but this is something to be wary of. Lots of dishes have egg and some tuna from a can. 

Drinks-Hot drinks are on the menu at every guesthouse, with an often huge range of options stretching from regular black tea and coffee to Masala tea, lemon ginger honey tea, and hot chocolate. 

Manaslu Trek Cost-Manaslu Trek package costs ranges from USD 1500 to USD 1800 and includes all transfers, accommodation, meals, permits, and even the hotel stay before and after the trek.

Internet, Wifi, Sim cards and staying Charged 
If you’re looking to stay connected while trekking the Manaslu Circuit, the options are fairly limited.
Wifi: Wifi is available at some guesthouses in places such as Samagaun, Samdo and Lho. There is however normally a charge for using the internet, and with slow speeds, you may end up wishing you hadn’t bothered. If there’s nothing urgent, our advice would be to wait until you get back from the mountains.Costs anywhere from $4 to $6 to use WiFi at the guesthouses. 

Sim Cards-4G sim cards and packages can be bought at the airport, or from numerous vendors in the Thamel area of Kathmandu. They’re great in the city but as soon as you leave the coverage is patchy. We recommend Nepal Telecom and Ncell for 3G/4G coverage. It’s safe to say that in the mountains, neither are really any good. 

Electricity-You will have to pay anywhere from $3 at low elevation to $5 to charge your power banks, cameras, and phones. The key is to get a fat power bank. Pay to charge that then charge everything from your power bank.Your power bank lets you charge your phone and camera batteries. Most of the places you stay let you charge your gear for an extra cost.

Day 01: Arrive in Kathmandu (1,300m/4,264ft)
Upon arrival at Kathmandu airport, receive you there and  transfer to hotel. Stroll around Thamel, a tourist hub in Kathmandu. Overnight in Kathmandu.
Day 02: Kathmandu Valley sightseeing and Trek Preparation
After breakfast, you will set out for sightseeing tour in Kathmandu to Pashupati temple, Kathmandu durbar square, Swoyambhunath and Boudha stupa.
Day 03: Kathmandu – Arughat (670m/2,198 ft) – Soti Khola (710m/2,330ft, 135km, 8-9 hrs drive) 
Breakfast and drive to Sotikhola via Dhadingbesi and Arughat, the starting point of Manaslu Circuit Trek.
Day 04: Soti Khola – Machha Khola (890m/2,920ft, 6-7 hrs)
After breakfast, today’s trail rises gradually through beautiful Sal forests. It then undulates over forested and terraced ridges passed numerous waterfalls. The trail is generally narrow, at times clinging to the sides of cliffs. It later drops to pass rice paddies before climbing to the attractive Gurung village of Labubesi (885m/2,800ft). After crossing a suspension bridge at the spectacular Nauli Khola falls, the valley opens out and the trail drops onto gravel banks along the river before rising slightly to the village of Machha (Fish) Khola. 
Day 05: Machha Khola – Dobhan (1,000m/3,280ft, 6-7 hrs) 
The trail follows the river, with minor ups and downs, often dropping to the gravel bar before crossing the Thado Khola and on up to Khorlabesi: where coffee, buckwheat, and tobacco are grown. A trail from Gorkha joins the Manaslu circuit here and the Great Himalayan Trail turns east from the Manaslu to the Langtang and Everest regions. Our trail then enters a lush narrow gorge that constricts the river’s progress. Beyond is a landslide with a dicey path, shortly before the triple hot spring spouts in Tatopani. The trail then climbs a ridge before crossing the Budhi Gandaki on a suspension bridge (to avoid a huge cliff face and waterfalls. A good staircase leads to a landslide before a final ridge climb to Dobhan. 
Day 06: Dobhan – Philim (1,590m/5,216ft, 6-7 hrs)
Exit over the Dobhan Khola and continue up the east bank of the Budhi Gandaki to the hamlet of Thulo Dhunga; above cataracts. Further on the gradient changes; the valley opens and the river flow at Yaruphant is placid. Cross an old suspension bridge over the Yaru Khola (from Ganesh II and VI), then climb to Thado Bharyang. Cross to the west bank of the Budhi Gandaki and follow the river gently upwards to the old village of Jagat: entrance and checkpoint to the restricted Manaslu Conservation Area.  Cross a tributary and walk on to Salleri, via a cliff-side trail – with views of the Shringi Himal (7,187m/23,580ft) to the north. Descend to Sirdibas; and the first signs of Buddhist culture. Another suspension bridge leads to the east bank, and a tiring climb up to Philim: a prosperous Gurung village and the Chholing Sandu Gompa surrounded by fields of maize and millet. 
Day 07: Philim – Deng (2240m/7350ft, 6-7 hrs) 
Traverse north of Philim, through lush grasses and scrub up the exquisite narrowing valley to the village of Chisopani and then the millet fields of Ekle Bhatti (one house, 1 600m/5,250ft). The trail then gradually descends, beneath a spectacular waterfall, into the gorge below and a junction before “New Bridge” which leads to the Larkya La.   (The right-hand trail leads to the Tsum Valley). Cross the Budhi Gandaki and enter its narrow gorge on an up-and-down trail with river crossings. After a suspension bridge, the trail enters the bamboo forest and rises to the village of Deng (1,800m/5,906ft). From here there are good views of Shringi Himal to the northeast. 
Day 08: Deng – Namrung (2,660m/8,725ft, 6-7 hrs).
This is the entry point to Kutang or lower Nupri, the part of Tibet until the 1840s and a region inhabited by Gurungs who practice Buddhism, have their own language and trade across the passes with Tibet. The trail crosses to the east bank and zigzags up to Rana. A short series of vertical switchbacks then lead to a log-bridge tributary crossing and an isolated water mill before the trail descends gently to the lodge at Bihi Phedi, high above the river. Beyond, the trail drops to cross the Serang Khola and later enters an impressive S bend between sheer basalt walls. To the right, huge rocky crags appear – with a spectacular waterfall above fields of maize and wheat. Beyond the valley broadens and turns northeast; the trail crosses a bridge before a well-preserved entrance Kani and walls of carved mani stones that lead to the attractive village of Ghap (2,250m/7,382ft) on the south bank. The trail then ascends through bamboo, rhododendron and oak forest (with birds that include the Impheyan Pheasant) above the steeply descending river. For a short section, it is forced back to the north bank by sheer walls and re-crosses back to the south bank on a wooden bridge (above a natural stone bridge) at a point where the river thunders down a narrow defile. It then climbs steeply (for 1hr) away from the river to Namrung: a police checkpoint for permits. Before reaching the village, the trail overlooks the Tum Khola from Tibet whose waters considerably increase the Budhi Gandaki’s volume at the confluence (not visible from the trail). 
Day 09: Namrung – Lho (3,180m/10,430ft, 3-4 hrs)
Namrung is the entrance to Upper Nupri (the western mountains) a region of purely Tibetan inhabitants who speak a (different) dialect of western Tibet and continue to trade across the passes to Lho, Manaslu (8,156m/26,760ft, the mountain of the spirit from the Sanskrit Manasa – ‘intellect’ or ‘soul’, the 8th highest peak), Manaslu North and Naike Peak are revealed for the first time. A steep pull leads to the ridge and the large village of Lho. Many of the stone houses in this region have distinctive wooden decks and shingles. The large Ribung monastery above the village houses ~150 monks. The best spot for sunset and sunrise pictures is from a Kani above the village; reached by a walk through barley fields, past a long mani wall and old Chortens. Rise early for sunrise shots of Manaslu.
Day 10: Lho – Sama Gaon (3,530m/11,578ft, 5-6 hrs)   
The Budi Gandaki now flows far below in the valley north of the trail which passes the long mani wall out of Lho, before dropping steeply to cross the Damonan Khola tributary. It then follows a gentle stream upwards through the exquisite mixed forest. Then a short climb to a plateau: and the badly deforested village of Shyala (3,520m/11,549ft). Huge mountains surround it: Himal Chuli (7,893m/25,897ft) and Peak 29 (Ngadi Chuli, 7,873m/25,831ft) to the south; Manaslu (8,156m/26,760ft) and large glaciers ahead; more snow-capped peaks to the west and north. Further on, the trail crosses a bridge over the Numla Khola that drains the Pungyen Glacier from Manaslu. Later a trail leads left to Pungyen Gompa. Continue down the broad valley, past a school, to a large Chorten, beyond which a yellow Kani leads to rows of houses with front courtyards that form the main part of Sama. The Kargyu Chholing Monastery stands above the far end of the village against a forested moraine. Only the upper sections of Manaslu and the Naike ridge are visible from the village. 
Day 11: Sama: Rest and exploration day: Birendra Tal / Pungyen Gompa / Manaslu Base Camp
Sama is the regional center of Nupri. Explore the village architecture and customs: only potatoes and barley flourish in the short summers at this altitude. Cloth weaving for chubas (from local goat and sheep wool or Tibetan imported wool) and the manufacture of hooked rugs are important occupations for trade with Tibet. Yak and Dzopkyo herds and horses are kept and traded and exploration hike to the Pungyen Nunnery (3,870m/12,697ft) that stands on a plateau above the Pungyen Glacier offers unbeatable views of the Nadi ridges and Manaslu from near the gompa. It also adds an illuminating perspective of the mountain and its satellites to the other views seen along the circuit trail. Walk back along the trail, past the school, to the turnoff to the Pungyen Nunnery.  It lies over the ridge on a plateau above the glacier and looks out onto Manaslu (known locally as Kang Pungyen).  The two and half hours trail through summer Kharkas (no teahouses) along the Numa Khola and Pungyen Glacier can be icy and slippery. Above the complex is a cave gompa with yet better views. 
Day 12: Sama – Samdo (3,860m/12,660ft, 3-4 hrs) 
Breakfast and a short trek of 4 hours to Samdo is the last village before Gho, in the Manang District. Only informal Kharkas (with lodges) lie between these villages. 
Day 13: Samdo – Larkya Phedi/Dharamsala (4,460m/14,628ft, 3-4 hrs)
Descend past the northern village fields to cross the Budhi Gandaki for the last time at the remains of the Larkya Bazaar site. The river turns north up the Pana Danda Valley. Follow the westward trail on grassy slopes with scrub juniper, rhododendron and lichen-covered granite above the Syacha Khola Valley. The source of the Syacha Glacier that descends from the Manaslu North ridge comes into sight. The trail works its way gradually up the valley towards the Larkya Glacier beyond the Larkya La Phedi, called Dharamsala.  The guest house is a simple stone structure: with a kitchen and dining room, two separate buildings with 15 small double rooms, two tunnel-tents each with 8 cramped beds and a third for trekking staff. Short walks can lead to better views of the Larke (6,249m/20,503ft) and Naike (6,291m/20,641ft) peaks. 
Day 14: Dharamsala – Larkya La (5,160m/16,930ft) – Bimthang (3,720m/12,201ft, 7-9 hrs) 
Today’s pass needs, if snow-free, 3-5 hours to ascend the 800m/2,600ft to the summit and 3-4 hours to descend the 1,500m/4,900ft to Bimthang. Bimthang is now the summer grazing settlement for the people of Samdo. Before the closure of the Tibetan border, it was an important trading post. The Tibetan Khampa warriors held a center here in the 1970s. It can be very cold, especially if windy. Snow and ice conditions demand more care and time. This is the longest and hardest day of the Manaslu trek.
Day 15: Bimthang – Gho (2,515m/8,250ft, 5-6 hrs)
A further descent begins with a walk across the Bimthang Plain, a drop to cross the stony glacier then up and over the far moraine to enter magnificent pristine rhododendron and pine forest. Views back towards the Larke, Manaslu, Nadi and Chuli Himals are excellent all along this route. The trail descends along the west bank of the Dudh (milk) Khola past Hompuk (3,430m/11,254ft, a rock shelter near the bridge) and attractive Sangura Kharka (3,020m/9,909ft) before descending steeply to the highest cultivated land at Karche (2,700m/8,860ft). Beyond is a flood-related landslide, more terraced fields, and a steep ridge climb before dropping to the substantial (Gurung) village of Gho. 
Day 16: Gho – Dharapani (1,920m/6,300ft, 3-4 hrs)
After breakfast, trek through farmlands to the old paved village of Tilje (2,300m/7,546ft), then cross to the east bank of the river before descending rapidly towards the Marsyangdi Valley through the scrub forest. Cross back to the west bank just before Thonje (1,965m/6,447ft) and then, in Thonje, cross the Marsyangdi Khola (from Manang) just above the confluence before joining the new road along the main Annapurna Circuit route in Dharapani at the perfect lunchtime and end of the trek. Afternoon enjoys a hot shower and wanders around this Tibetan village. 
Day 17: Dharapani- Besi Sahar (760m/2,495ft) – Kathmandu (1,300m/4,264ft, 9-10 hrs)   
After breakfast, a sharing jeep ride along the dusty and bumpy road to Besisahar and a public bus ride along the paved road back to Kathmandu. 
Day 18: Kathmandu Airport
Breakfast and final transfer to Kathmandu airport to get flight backt o home.

Cost Includes

  • Airport transfers-Hotel/Airport
  • Ground transfer between Kathmandu and Soti Khola and Chamje
  • Twin Sharing 3 star hotel in Kathmandu with breakfast
  • All meals and accommodations at the Lodges / Tea Houses during the trek
  • English-speaking trek guide and porter (1 porter for 2 pax, 20kg in total) and their expenses.
  • ACAP/MCAP permit and TIMS card
  • Manaslu trek permit 
  • Trekking map
  • All the local taxes for trekking.
Cost Excludes
  • Nepal entry visa fee
  • International flight to and from Kathmandu
  • Expenses of personal nature such as bar bills telephone calls, laundry, extra mileage and any extra costs incurred due to natural calamities, flight delays etc.
  • Travel-Personal insurance, evacuation and medical expenses
  • Tips and gratuities for the guide and porter
  • Tissue for toiletry
  • Water for shower and alcoholic/soft drinks in the mountain area
  • Items not specified in the above in Cost Includes.

Manaslu Trek Guide 
A guide is required on this trek and the guide manages all of the logistics, distances, directions, and tea houses. The directions are not always very clear like on the Everest Base Camp trek and having the guide manage all of the logistics is great.The Manaslu Circuit Trek does require a guide. Everest Base Camp and Annapurna Circuit can be done independently but the rules on the Manaslu Circuit are stricter about having a guide.
Money-Everything is payable in the local currency, Nepalese Rupees (NPR).Take plenty of small denomination notes as change is not readily available on the trail, particularly at higher altitudes. Also beware that ATM have max withdrawal amounts, and your bank may have a max daily withdrawal limit, so you may not be able to withdraw the total amount that you need all in one day. The amount of money you need to take on the Manaslu Circuit Trek will depend on whether you’re on an inclusive tour or not. If you are on an inclusive tour then you’ll only need money for any snacks or drinks over and above what’s included in your package. If you are paying as you go, then you’ll need to have enough cash to cover all costs: accommodation, food, drink, etc.
Manaslu Trek Packing List
We would suggest to take what you need and make your bag as light as possible.You can expect to need more warm clothes in the colder months. Also, crampons may be needed if there’s ice and snow on the pass. On the other hand, if you plan to trek with a porter then this will make choosing what to take a bit easier – just don’t overload your porter of course. Also, bear in mind that it’s very common to leave excess baggage at hotels and guesthouses in Kathmandu.

1 Rucksack-60L to 70L
1 Sleeping Bag
1 pair of pants that maybe convert to shorts
1 pair of shorts
1 Warm or thicker pair of hiking pants
1 Long sleeve quick-dry shirt
1 Long-sleeve thermal shirt
2 Short-sleeve t-shirts
1 Thermal long underwear
4 pairs of quick-dry underwear
1 Lightweight down jacket
1 Heavy-duty summit down jacket
1 Beanie
1 Cap
Sunglasses
1 Neck Buff
Gloves
Hiking boots
Microspikes
Head torch
Gaiters
1 pair of warm summit socks
2 pairs of regular socks
Sunscreen
Trekking poles
Water filter
Power bank
Insurance for the Manaslu Circuit Trek
Travel insurance is compulsory trekking in Manaslu because the high altitude can lead to many illnesses, weakness in trekkers, and misjudgments. There is also a risk on trails for falls, avalanches, or other mishaps. 
Best Seasons Trekking Manaslu Circuit
Autumn-The best time to go trekking in Manaslu is from September to November. The weather is generally dry and clear, with warm sunny days and excellent visibility. There’s a lower likelihood of weather related natural disasters at this time of year, making for a much safer trekking environment. Furthermore, given that it’s the best season, it’s also the busiest.
Spring-The spring season from March to May is considered to be the next best option. The weather is generally clear although a little colder, particularly at higher altitudes. Mornings are sunny and flowers are in bloom. There is however a higher chance of rain, or even snow, and melting ice increases the chances of landslides or avalanches.
Summer-June to August is to be avoided. The monsoon is responsible for warm and wet weather, with cloud and mist making visibility extremely poor. You can hardly see a mountain. Leeches are a big problem at this time of year, as is the risk of landslides. As the Manaslu Region was one of the worst affected by the 2015 earthquake, there are many landslide areas – these can be more dangerous in wet weather.
Winter-In the winter, from December to February, temperatures in higher altitudes plunge. Snow and ice make this time of year unsuitable for the Manaslu Circuit Trek.
Drinking Water
The Manaslu Circuit is physically demanding and drinking plenty of water is a must.Drinking lots of water helps you acclimatize. Please drink at least three liters of water while trekking each day.Use an effective sterilization method to make sure your water is safe to drink.Purification tablets (we always have a few strips of these as a backup) and the Steripen is a perfect means sterilization the drinking water.Bottled water and hot water is available to buy throughout the trek, the cost ranges from USD 3 to USD 5 per liters.
Nepal Visa
Tourist visas are available on arrival at Kathmandu-Tribhuvan International Airport and at all land border crossings that are open to foreign travellers. While this is available for most foreigners, citizens of some countries are required to get a visa prior to arrival, while those from SAARC countries can get their visa free of charge.There are three different visa options and prices: Multiple Entry 15 Days – 30 USD, 30 Days – 50 USD and 90 Days – 125 USD. In order to get a visa on arrival you’ll need four things:
One passport size photo
A passport valid for at least six months
At least one blank page in your passport
The visa fee in cash (US Dollars is best)

  • Jan
  • Feb
  • March
  • April
  • May
  • Jun
  • Jul
  • Aug
  • Sept
  • Oct
  • Nov
  • Dec

June, 2024

Departure DateAvalabilityDurationCost/PersonJoin Group
June 29Guaranteed18 daysUSD 1550-USD 1950Join Now

Frequently Asked Questions Section


What Our Client Says